Seminar Series

David Ribar discusses how children’s intellectual and behavioural outcomes differ conditional on whether their biological parents dissolved their relationships in high- and low-conflict circumstances. He explores how he utilized data from the 1st through 5th waves of the birth and kindergarten cohorts of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) to study parental dissolution and conflict are associated with worse outcomes for Australian children, especially among the younger children in the LSAC birth cohort.
Date
11/17/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
Social status is one of the strongest predictors of disease risk and mortality in humans, and may influence Darwinian fitness in social mammals more generally. Duke's Noah Snyder-Mackler discusses how his study combined genomics with a social status manipulation in female rhesus macaques to investigate how status alters immune function. He also reviews how his findings provide insight into the direct biological effects of social inequality on immune function, thus contributing to an improved understanding of social gradients in health and the evolution of social hierarchies.
Date
11/10/2016
Venue
A103 Erwin Mill Bldg- 2024 W. Main St.
In the past few years, the Social Science Genetic Association Consortium (SSGAC) has been conducting large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses of behavioral phenotypes, including educational attainment, subjective well-being (i.e., happiness), and fertility. Dan Benjamin reviews the results of these studies and also provides some background on the SSGAC and discusses ongoing work-in-progress.
Date
10/27/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
Research computing has changed dramatically in the last few years, and those changes are reshaping how Duke provides research computing support to Duke researchers. The scope and characteristics of computing for research has long come in "large packages" that have unyielding rules and restrictions -- to which researchers conformed their research projects. Increasingly, the emphasis has shifted, so that researchers now have the opportunity to tailor computing resources to fit their particular needs. Duke's Mark DeLong explores this transformation in research computing and presents offerings that Duke Research Computing has developed.
Date
10/20/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall

Contemporary and Emerging Challenges: Drug Overdose, Smoking, and Educational Gradients in Life Expectancy

Date
10/14/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
In recent years, polygenic scores have become the favored tool for summarizing the influence of genetic predispositions on phenotypic characteristics and behavior when the genetic effect arises from the accumulation of small effects from a potentially very large number of genetic markers. Columbia University's Thomas DiPrete discusses the potential use of polygenic scores as proxies for unobservables in the context of a returns to schooling estimation.
Date
10/13/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
Oxford University's Melinda Mills discusses her projects, which combine demographic, sociological, biological and molecular genetic research to study the life course.
Date
9/29/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
Using individually linked data for all RI children born between 1991 and 2005 that includes early childhood blood lead levels, in-school disciplinary infractions and juvenile detention, Anna Aizer examines the impact of early lead exposure on future delinquency. She discusses how exposure to lead is associated with a significantly greater likelihood of in-school disciplinary infractions and juvenile detention.
Date
9/22/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
Cornell University's Chris Wildeman discusses maltreatment, racial inequality and geographic variation in the foster care system.
Date
9/08/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall
UCLA'S Rodrigo Pinto examines a range of questions regarding social experiments concerning young adults: inference under compromised randomization, cost-benefit analysis, external validity and impact evaluation. He also discusses the economics of human capital accumulation of early childhood interventions, policy evaluation, and causality.
Date
8/31/2016