Seminar Series

Ridhi Kashyap discusses the demographic implications of one of the most striking expressions of gender inequalty — son preference. Kashyap examines both the postnatal manifestations of son preference in the form of gender gaps in mortality and health, as well as in the prenatal manifestations in the form of sex-selective abortion and sex ratio at birth distortions. Kashyap also looks at the long-term implications of son preference and sex ratio distortions for population dynamics.
Date
9/14/2017
Venue
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
Robert Pollak discusses the substantial effects of fathers' multiple-partner fertility (MPF) on children's long-term educational outcomes. He posits that analysis suggests that the effects of fathers' MPF are primarily due to selection rather than resources. He also discusses how his results show that fathers’ MPF warrants far more attention than it has thus far received.
Date
4/12/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall
For children, parental separation is often accompanied by an increased risk of poverty and deteriorating living standards. These effects have been studied over relatively short periods of time, and not considering the multi-faceted context of childhood disadvantage. Lidia Panico discusses how she used the UK Millennium Cohort Study, a nationally representative cohort of over 18,000 children, to consider how parental separation affects the experience of childhood poverty and multi-domain deprivation from birth to age 11.
Date
3/23/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall
It is now recognized among many scholars that most socio-behavioral outcomes evince both strong genetic and environmental components that contribute to their variation in natural populations. The next step in reconciling nature and nurture, then, is to properly model gene-environment interplay. Princeton’s Dalton Conley discuss a series of attempts to apply econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects. He also reviews alternatives to conceptualizing and measuring genetic regulation of plasticity that may inform GxE models.
Date
3/09/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall
Understanding demographic responses to climate-related natural disasters has garnered sustained attention ever since the 2007 IPCC report. There is the challenge of accounting for the entire complexity of human behavioral and institutional responses. The University of Washington’s Sara Curran discusses how her recent study produced models that can be used to address some of the challenges facing policy makers and researchers seeking to understand the complexities of human responses to climate change.
Date
3/06/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall
In this talk, Michael Kobor highlights the emerging role of epigenetic modifications at the interface between environments and the genome. Drawing on a large interdisciplinary research network of human population studies with partners from child development, psychology, psychiatry, and epidemiology, Kobor discusses how early life adversities such as poverty and family stress can ”get under the skin” to affect health and behavior across the lifespan.
Date
2/23/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall

Race/Ethnicity and Health in the Trump Era: Evidence-Based Projections and Speculations

 

Date
2/16/2017
Venue
Rubenstein Library, Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room (Room 153)
Smoking and obesity are the top-two leading causes of preventable disease and death in the US and significant sources of the substantial disparities in health between socioeconomic status (SES) groups. Pietro Biroli discusses his recent study that constructed poligenic risk scores (PGS) to evaluate whether these genetic variants mediate the effects of childhood SES in determining adult risky health behaviors. He also reviews the empirical results of the study through the lenses of a canonical economic model of health formation and addiction, extended to include genetic heterogeneity.
Date
2/09/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall
Research on the environmental dimensions of migration has burgeoned over the past several years. Prof. Hunter provides an overview of this work, with specific examples from her own collaborative scholarship on migration within, and from, Mexico. She will also offer a brief glimpse into her research on natural resource availability and livelihood migration from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in rural South Africa. In this presentation, she’ll also highlight the challenges facing migration-environment scholars and pathways forward.
Date
1/26/2017
Venue
230E Gross Hall
UCLA's Steve Horvath discusses epigenetic biomarkers of aging (the “epigenetic clock”), and examines their potential in addressing puzzling findings surrounding mortality rates and incidence of cardio-metabolic disease such as: (1) women consistently exhibiting lower mortality than men despite having higher levels of morbidity; (2) racial/ethnic groups having different mortality rates even after adjusting for socioeconomic differences; (3) the black/white mortality cross-over effect in late adulthood; and (4) Hispanics in the United States having a longer life expectancy than Caucasians despite having a higher burden of traditional cardio-metabolic risk factors.
Date
12/08/2016
Venue
270 Gross Hall