Seminar Series

Thursday, October 17, 2019, 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm, Gross Hall 270

Date
10/17/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall

Thursday, October 10, 2019, 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm, Gross Hall 270

Date
10/10/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall

Thursday, October 3, 2019, 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm., Gross Hall 270

DUPRI  presents two individual lectures for the Demography of Aging Training Seminar: 

1) Molly Copeland, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, Duke University

Date
10/03/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall
This talk presents results from four separate papers, which illustrate the importance of intimate relationships as the immediate context of whether young women get what they want in terms of their reproductive behaviors. The analyses are based on the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life (RDSL) study, conducted by Jennifer Barber, Yasamin Kusunoki, and Heather Gatny. The four papers compare a woman's desires and expectations across different times within a relationship using fixed-effects models. 
Date
9/26/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall
While workplace flexibility is perceived to be a key determinant of maternal labor supply, less is known about fathers' demand for flexibility or about intra-household spillover effects of flexibility initiatives. Maya Rossin-Slater examines these issues in the context of a critical period in family life---the months immediately following childbirth---and identifies the impacts of paternal access to workplace flexibility on maternal postpartum health.
Date
9/19/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall
In the psychology literature it’s not uncommon to read speculation about whether adult age differences in behavior are due to “biological declines” OR “motivational changes”. The implication of these alternatives is that motivational change or preservation is not biological. The authors speculating are not necessarily dualists, but rather these questions have emerged as an artifact of the tools being used to study adult age effects on cognition and motivation. There has been a historical incompatibility in the field between motivational theories that are largely verbal and based on behavioral evidence and cognitive theories which are often more computational and based on a combination of behavioral and neurobiological evidence. In this more theoretically leaning talk, I will briefly present a series of findings from studies using fMRI and PET imaging of the dopamine system that are beginning to provide a neurobiological account of motivation and aging. In addition to resolving dualistic accounts of aging, the studies have identified preservation of motivational systems that may be used to further enhance function in older age. These discoveries have led to a shift in our lab research from primarily studying financial health to also studying physical health behavior change.
Date
9/12/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall
The U.S. is the only advanced industrialized country without a national policy providing paid family and medical leave. In recent years, a handful of states and localities have begun to enact state or local legislation in this area. The effects of such laws on outcomes for employees have been studied, but we know relatively little about impacts on employers. In this talk, Jane Waldfogel will present findings from a program of research to address this gap that she has undertaken with colleagues Ann Bartel, Christopher Ruhm, and Maya Rossin-Slater.
Date
9/05/2019
Venue
270 Gross Hall
More than 600,000 prisoners are released from U.S. prisons each year, and roughly one-half of these individuals are back in prison within just three year, creating a vicious cycle of recidivism. In this seminar, Kirk discusses the experimental housing mobility program for recently released prisoners, The Maryland Opportunities through Vouchers Experiment (MOVE). Kirk designed MOVE to test whether residential relocation far away from former neighborhoods can yield reductions in recidivism.
Date
3/28/2019
Venue
SSRI Gross Hall Rm 270
Duke University's Cheryl Elman discusses the relationship between development and disease in the twentieth century American south. Plantation croppers, disproportionately African American, were generally malnourished, poorly housed, and legally tied to farms through debt to plantation owners and local merchants. The southern population through the 1940s was also exposed to poor sanitation and parasitic diseases of malaria and hookworm.
Date
3/21/2019
Venue
SSRI-Gross Hall 270
In this seminar, Filiz Garip discusses how homophily and consolidation allow researchers to capture the structural constraints to diffusion, and explains why some newly-emerging migrant communities eventually come to surpass historic migrant regions in levels of migration.
Date
2/28/2019
Venue
SSRI-Gross Hall 270